24 Hours in Hobart

Posted by Stephanie Mikkelsen on Thursday, July 20, 2017

It's no secret that Hobart has a serious buzz about it these days.

There are pursuits to suit every style, from heritage sites for history buffs, rugged mountains for hiking enthusiasts and romantic waterfronts for loved-up couples. Then you have the gourmet eateries that give Melbourne and Sydney a run for their money, the world-famous galleries and excellent nightlife.

To help you discover all the best bits, we’ve created an itinerary for your first 24 hours in Hobart. Be warned, you'll probably want to stay much, much longer…

Getting There

Tasmania takes the gong as Australia’s only island state, so hop aboard a plane or boat. Reluctant to leave your wheels at home? A ticket on the Spirit of Tasmania means you can drive on in Melbourne and drive off in Devonport, which is about three hours from Hobart. For those flying in, the Tasmanian Redline Airporter Shuttle can take you into the city centre and drop you off at your hotel (bookings are required). Alternatively, a taxi rank is located directly out of the front of the main building and will cost around $42. Those planning to use public transport to explore Hobart should pick up a Metro Tasmania ticket from any newsagent or Metro Shop.

In 24 Hours

Morning Fix | 8am

Make your way to Battery Point, a suburb just south of Hobart’s CBD. It used to be an old maritime village and features a cluster of laneways, 19th-century cottages, guesthouses and eateries. Pollen Tea Room is a warm, cosy cafe, home to a menu dotted with dishes like coconut yoghurt, crushed avocado and green smoothies. There is a good selection of vegan and vegetarian-friendly options too. Those travellers that prefer to a sleep-in can head to Smolt for a late brunch.

Beautiful Accommodation Hobart Itinerary

Image: Salamanca Market. Graham Freeman; Tourism Australia

Market Meander | 9am

From the café, you’re less than a 10-minute walk from one of Hobart’s most loved attractions: Salamanca Market. The markets happen every Saturday, and see historic Salamanca Place host more than 300 stallholders. Wander through a maze of vendors selling fresh food, art, crafts, clothing and ceramics. If there’s still room in your tum, you might want to pick up some fruit, a hot coffee and fresh croissants. Buskers singing the blues and musicians strumming folk songs make for the perfect morning soundtrack.

Art Attack | 10.30am

The Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) is Australia’s largest private museum and is guaranteed to make an impression, whether you’re a seasoned gallery goer or an art novice. The gallery is set on Moorilla Winery and has a collection bursting with boundary-pushing pieces. There are more than 300 contemporary works on display, including temporary exhibitions. You can reach the museum on the MR-I Fast Ferry, which leaves from the MONA Ferry Terminal on Brooke Street. The MONA Roma Express bus also leaves from the terminal. Tickets for the ferry or bus start from $22, and entry into MONA is $28 for adults. You can grab a quick bite at the on-site restaurant, Source.

Beautiful Accommodation Hobart Itinerary

Image: Museum of Old and New Art. Joe McNally; Tourism Australia

City Bound | 1.30pm

Return to Hobart on the ferry or bus and arrive back in the CBD. Chances are you’re in need of refreshment, so how about a drop at Australia’s oldest operating brewery? Cascade Brewery can be found in South Hobart and gives visitors an insight into the brewing process. Take a tour ($30, including tasting, between 11am and 2.15pm; places are limited) or sample beers and ciders at the bar. The brewery sits on three acres of manicured gardens, so take some time to wander around too.

Afternoon Reset | 3pm

For another dose of the great outdoors, there’s no place like the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens. On your way, swing past Little Missy Patisserie to pick up some pastries and afternoon tea treats. Choose from sweet or savoury goodies – perhaps refuel with another coffee – and settle in at the gardens for a laid-back spread. When you’ve had your fill, wander through the Conservatory, take a load off at the sandstone fountains or continue people watching.

Cheers! | 4.30pm

North Hobart is quieter than Battery Point, and is popular with locals. It also happens to be home to a collection of buzzing restaurants and bars. Start with an afternoon tipple at cosy wine bar Willing Bros. Wine Merchants, or a relaxed brew at Republic Bar & Café. To find a watering hole that takes your fancy, you only need to stroll up and down Elizabeth Street.

Tuck In | 6.30pm

On a quiet one-way street set back from Elizabeth Street is Templo, a snug dining den where tables are hotly contested and the Italian fare is superb. Head closer to the waterfront to find a cluster of more top eateries and bars. Pearl + Co dishes up excellent seafood, Peacock and Jones is a restaurant and wine bar, and almost next door is Henry’s Restaurant. Of course, if you’re in the mood to eat with your fingers, a piping-hot serving of freshly cooked fish and chips could be the way to go. There's a string of shops offering both eat-in and takeaway options in the area.

Beautiful Accommodation Hobart Itinerary

Image: Peacock and Jones; Facebook

Draw the Curtain | 8pm

After a busy day it’s time to put up your feet, and visiting Theatre Royal, the oldest continually operating theatre in Australia, sounds like a pretty good start. With everything from classical orchestral performances and educational talks to hilarious comedy acts, you're sure to find something entertaining.

Night Cap | 10.30pm

In the last couple of years, a whisky trend has swept through Hobart and brought a bunch of dedicated whisky bars with it. So why not end your day in Hobart by sampling some of the city’s finest? Nant Whisky Bar is a particularly happening hotspot that's popular with both locals and visitors. Grape, a bar-bottleshop hybrid, is also open late for night-owls. 



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